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Applications for the FEJS Annual Congress 2016 are open now!
You can find further details here.

Windesheim’s School of Journalism in the Netherlands is the first international School of Journalism in the world to integrate Constructive Journalism into its curriculum, research and international partnerships. As part of this initiative, Cathrine Gyldensted, a leading Danish journalist and originator of this new form of journalism, has accepted the position of Director of Constructive Journalism at Windesheim.

The appointment of Gyldensted is in line with the degree programme’s explicit choice to make constructive, problem-solving journalism one of Windesheim’s top priorities. Gyldensted´s focus will be threefold: education, research and international cooperation.

Focus

Gyldensted will be integrating constructive journalism elements and techniques into the existing curriculum and develop an international Constructive Journalism minor. Secondly, Gyldensted will organize training courses for newsrooms and initiate interdisciplinary research with researchers at Windesheim and external partners. Thirdly, Gyldensted will establish partnerships around constructive journalism with interested schools of Journalism, universities and media organizations worldwide.

SPECIAL ISSUE
Should I post that picture or issue that story? Journalistic practices in the representation of the migrant crisis

Guest editors: Vittoria Sacco (Université de Neuchâtel) and Valérie Gorin (University of Geneva and Graduate Institute)

Human migration is not a new phenomenon. However, recently it has gained substantial space in media coverage. In particular, the images of the little Aylan, a child escaping Syria with his family, lying dead on Bodrum's beach, have raised old ethical questions of journalistic practices. Aylan’s pictures were extremely powerful and not without symbolism, becoming icons of Syria’s tragedy. They went viral on social media, but they were also criticized. Several media opted not to show the images. The criticism centered on whether it was justifiable or ethical to direct readers’ attention to the conflict in Syria with stark images of an innocent victim. There were parallels to the images of Kim Phuc, the little girl running naked and screaming in Vietnam in 1972.
This very issue of audience engagement with crisis is a topic of heated debate in academia. In her book “Compassion fatigue: how the media sell disease, famine, war and death” (1999), Susan Moeller discusses audience engagement with the news coverage of war, conflict or other types of violence. The media has thus the potential to stress particular forms of engagement to mobilize the public and create a collective memory amongst audiences. Exposed daily to distant suffering, the audience can develop apathy and disengage with events, resulting in compassion fatigue.
Kerry Moore, Bernhard Gross and Terry Threadgold drive same message home in their book on “Migration and the Media” (2012). They try to trace the reporting practices that produce migration coverage. A large part of academic studies has otherwise explored visual representations of migrants and refugees in humanitarian appeals (Mannik 2012), emphasizing the role of aid agencies in framing visual stereotypes of helpless people (Rajaram 2002) or racializing, victimizing and feminizing the refugees (Johnson 2011). However, the questions around how the problem of compassion fatigue challenges journalistic practices, and what the news boundaries and standards when reporting crises should be in a digital online age, has had less attention in academic research.
This special issue of the “Journal of Applied Journalism and Media Studies” (AJMS) aims to shed some light on the complex ecosystem journalists covering the crisis face. It invites contributions on the relationship between journalistic practices and audience compassion fatigue, as well as the role of social media and new technologies on how to have it alleviated.
The guest editor welcomes contributions from both scholars and practitioners in the field of media and journalism studies and practice. Scholarly submissions can have a theoretical, analytic, critical, empirical or comparative angle.

More information and guidelines for submission:

The one‐year Master's programme in investigative journalism (MIJ) provides a rich understanding of investigative journalism as a democratic phenomenon, plus the skills to conceive, design, conduct, deliver and publish effective journalistic investigations in today’s digital media environments.

For more information about the programme, admission, the department etc, please visit the JMG website.

Message from Elanie Steyn, University of Oklahoma.

Big part of the success of the WJEC conference is getting reviewers to review paper abstracts and help us identify the best papers to be presented at the conference.  As we are approaching the submission deadline, we need your help in distributing to your members the request for reviewers to volunteer for this process.
Please direct them to follow the following instructions if they are volunteering to help us with this:

- by going to the link in parentheses reviewers will go to the home page under "call for abstracts;"
- there they will click on “Abstract Reviewer;”
- they should then register to be a reviewer by filling out the short reviewer signup sheet that tells us more of what their areas of expertise are, so we can assign them to the proper paper abstracts.

Please encourage your members to sign up and help us with this process.

If they (or you) have any questions, please feel free to contact me:

Please check the conference website to find information about the programme (speakers, schedule) and the venue.

We are looking forward to welcome you in Milan in 3 weeks!

 

The Forum for European Journalism Students (FEJS) International kindly invites students from EJTA members to the 2015 General Assembly (GA) in Porto, Portugal. The GA will take place from the 8th to the 12th of October. 
The event is aimed at European students of journalism, media and communication, as well as young professionals. The purpose of FEJS is to create a network and platform for young journalists to meet, discuss and learn. For more information on the General Assembly and on FEJS in general, check the FEJS website.

 

The fourth World Journalism Education Congress will be held at the Auckland University of Technology in Auckland, New Zealand between July 14 and 16, 2016 . It follows the successful third congress held in Mechelen, Belgium, in July 2013. The theme of the conference is: “Identity and Integrity in Journalism Education”.  The WJEC is inviting academic paper abstracts related to the wider issue of journalism education for presentation as refereed research papers at the conference.

Our colleagues in Milan are organizing the conference Narrative Journalism and Storytelling on Digital Platforms, that is aimed at teachers from EJTA-members. Please have a look at the conference website and let your teachers register as soon as possible.

 

You can still submit your abstracts for the second edition of the Prague Media Point conference series called Populism, authoritarianism, and the media: The age of mediocracy and mediacracy, which will take place on November 12-14, 2015. It will feature panel and poster presentations focused on examining the transformation of media in an age of information being used and abused by authoritarian rulers. For extra information and updates on speakers please follow the conference website. You can also follow the conference on Facebook and Twitter at #PragueMediaPoint.

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